Medicaid payer status is associated with increased mortality and morbidity after inpatient shoulder arthroplasty: a multistate analysis, 2007-2014.

TitleMedicaid payer status is associated with increased mortality and morbidity after inpatient shoulder arthroplasty: a multistate analysis, 2007-2014.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsLike BJ, White RS, Tangel V, Sullivan KJ, Arroyo NS, Stambough JB, Turnbull ZA
JournalReg Anesth Pain Med
Volume44
Issue2
Pagination182-190
Date Published2019 Feb
ISSN1532-8651
Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Inpatient shoulder arthroplasty is widely performed around the USA at an increasing rate. Medicaid insurance has been identified as a risk factor for inferior surgical outcomes. We sought to identify the impact of being Medicaid-insured on in-hospital mortality, readmission, complications, and length of stay (LOS) in patients who underwent inpatient shoulder arthroplasty.

METHODS: We analyzed 89 460 patient discharge records for inpatient total, partial, and reverse shoulder arthroplasties using data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's State Inpatient Databases for California, Florida, New York, Maryland, and Kentucky from 2007 through 2014. We compared patient demographics, present-on-admission comorbidities, and hospital characteristics by insurance payer. We estimated multilevel mixed-effect multivariate logistic regression models and generalized linear models to assess insurance's effect on in-hospital mortality, readmission, infectious complications, cardiac complications, and LOS; models controlled for patient and hospital characteristics.

RESULTS: Medicaid-insured patients had greater odds than patients with private insurance, other insurance, and Medicare of inpatient mortality (OR: 4.61, 95% CI 2.18 to 9.73, p<0.001) and 30-day and 90-day readmissions (OR: 1.94, 95% CI 1.57 to 2.38, p<0.001; OR: 1.65, 95% CI 1.42 to 2.38, p<0.001, respectively). Compared with private insurance, other insurance, and Medicare patients, Medicaid patients had increased likelihood of developing infectious complications and were expected to have longer LOS.

CONCLUSIONS: Our study supports our hypothesis that among inpatient shoulder arthroplasty patients, those with Medicaid insurance have worse outcomes than patients with private insurance, other insurance, and Medicare. These results are relatively consistent with previous findings in the literature.

DOI10.1136/rapm-2018-000020
Alternate JournalReg Anesth Pain Med
PubMed ID30700613

Center for Perioperative Outcomes
NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital 
Weill Cornell Medical Center
428 East 72nd Street, Suite 800A
New York, NY 10021
Phone: (646) 962-2671
Fax: (646) 962-0435