Sociodemographic Characteristics Predict Readmission Rates After Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery.

TitleSociodemographic Characteristics Predict Readmission Rates After Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsChen SA, White RS, Tangel V, Nachamie AS, Witkin LR
JournalPain Med
Date Published2019 Feb 06
ISSN1526-4637
Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the impact of social determinants of health (race/ethnicity, household income, insurance) and hospital surgical volume on 30- and 90-day readmissions after lumbar spinal fusion surgery.

Methods: A retrospective review of the State Inpatient Databases (SID) Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) included all patients age ≥18 years who underwent an index lumbar spinal fusion procedure and met inclusion criteria in California (2007-2011), Maryland (2012-2014), Florida, and New York (2007-2014). Primary outcomes were unadjusted rates and adjusted odds of readmission at 30 and 90 days postoperatively.

Results: After assessing for exclusion criteria, 267,976 patients were included in analyses. The overall 30-day readmission rate was 7.5%, and the 90-day readmission rate was 11.6%. Black patients (odds ratio [OR] = 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06-1.19) and patients with nonprivate insurance (Medicare OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.37-1.51; Medicaid OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.36-1.56; or uninsured OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.00-1.35) had higher odds of 30-day readmission, with comparable effects at 90 days. The three highest quartiles of hospital lumbar spine surgical volume had decreased odds for 30- and 90-day readmission when compared with the lowest quartile. Median income had no effect on readmission rates, save for the top quartile having lower odds of 90-day readmission than the bottom quartile.

Conclusions: Sociodemographic disparities in primary insurance payer, race/ethnicity, and hospital surgical volume affect lumbar spinal fusion surgery readmission rates. Public health interventions may improve readmissions and clinical outcomes and reduce health care costs.

DOI10.1093/pm/pny316
Alternate JournalPain Med
PubMed ID30726963

Center for Perioperative Outcomes
NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital 
Weill Cornell Medical Center
428 East 72nd Street, Suite 800A
New York, NY 10021
Phone: (646) 962-2671
Fax: (646) 962-0435